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Josephine Curry Hagerty
Hard to believe that we are catching up with the rest of you through none other than a blog. Thank you to the younger generation in our office as they birth us, knicking and screaming, into the world of social media.

I am by my Irish genetics a born storyteller and I hope to use this site as a kind of cozy living room or cool forest clearing where you may sit down, listen for a while, add to the story if you like, then gently rise and move on to the rest of your day.

When I was a young boy, my grandmother Josephine was standing with me on the rocks by my ancestral home looking out over the ocean and telling me a story. It was, I thought, an extraordinary one so I asked her "Nana, is that true?" The wind was blowing her white hair around as she turned and fixed me with her bright blue eyes.

"True, what do care if it is true? Truth has never fared me well."

She died not long after that special time and I never knew exactly what she meant. But as I grew older I learned more about her life and the history of our ancestors in Ireland and I began to understand some of what she may have wanted me to know.
Intermixed with the tales will be information that you hopefully will find helpful, stuff about friends with whom we work in disparate parts of the world and those just across the field and over the fence. We are constantly working with them to make better yarn and knitting products for you. If we create a light feeling about our blog, perhaps you might feel comfortable not only telling us what things we are doing right but more importantly suggesting how  we do things better. Thanks for dropping by. We look forward to your joining us on this journey wherever it may take us.
                        
                                                   Old Friend Knit along on Ravelry

Our baptisim to social media is our Peace Fleece Knit Along starting on August 1. Please visit Peace Fleece Lovers at Ravelry  to read more about the details.

The Old Friend Pullover is written for worsted weight but for those of you that want to use the lighter dk, please see below the addendum  that the author Peg Richard wrote especially for this KAL. Thank you Peg!

"Hi Peter, I think that it will be fairly easy to modify the Old Friend Pullover to fit the stitch
gauge for sports weight yarn. The sportsweight diamond pullover I designed oh so
many years ago actually has almost the same shape. It has a different style rib, but the
measurements and shape are similar, so here is how I have combined the directions
from the two sweater patterns to create the Old Friend Pullover in lighter yarn. The
important thing is to create shapes that match the measurements given on the back of
the pattern so that it will have the correct proportion when sewn together.
Lighter weight yarn modifications for the Old Friend Pullover:
Gauge: 9.5 st. over 2 inches
Needles: #5 and #7
Front: With smaller needles cast on 96, 104, 110 stitches. Work in k1p1 ribbing for 6
rows. Change to larger needles. When front measures 22 (23, 24) inches from the
bottom edge, begin neck decreases. Knit 33 (38, 39 stitches) attach another ball of
yarn, bind off 30 (30, 33 stitches) knit 33, (38, 39 stitches. Continue working in
stockinette stitches on both sides at once. Decrease 1 st. each side of neck edge every
other row 5 times. When front measures 25, 27, 28 inches from the bottom, bind off the
remaining stitches.
Back: Work as front until the back measures 23 1/2, 24 1/2, 25 1/2 inches from the
bottom edge and begin neck decreases: knit 33 (38, 39) stitches, attach another ball of
yarn, bind off 30 (30, 33) stitches, knit 33 (38, 39) stitches. Continue working in
stockinette stitch on both sides at once. Decrease 1 stitch each side of the neck
opening every other row 5 times. When back measures 25, 27, 28 stitches from the
bottom, bind off all remaining stitches.
Sleeves: With larger needles cast on 44 (48, 52) stitches. Work in stockinette stitch
increasing one stitch each side every 5th row 21(23, 25) for a total of 90 (100, 110
stitches.) When sleeve measures 18 (19, 10) inches, bind off all stitches.
Finishing: Follow directions for the Old Friend Pullover finishing. Use a smaller size
crochet hook if the finishing crochet stitches look too loose.
Nice to hear from you again, My best to Marty, Peg"

 


07/10/2013 8:08pm

The blog looks lovely Peter and Marti! And how interesting about your grandmother and her comment "what do you care if it's true?" In my family we ask "is that story true or did you Irish it up?" My side of the family is mostly Scots/Irish and I am particularly well known for my creative story telling. Joe's side is Portuguese, hence Marques.

Reply
Tara Shea
07/11/2013 9:13am

Happy to see you here! Good for you, and I hope the birth process is mostly painless!

Reply
Maureen Moffat
07/12/2013 7:46pm

Born to Irish Canadians, I so long for the lilt of their stories. Been a long long time that I've heard the final twist to an otherwise sorrowful tale, turned to humor and everyone laughing till they cried. You know what I mean. So please, full steam ahead on your tales. I can't wait.

Reply
07/16/2013 11:28am

Thanks Maureen,

I have a bunch of stories stored away and hopefully will get them out to all of you in the coming months. I have always felt that my strength was as an oral storyteller, hoping that my dramas might stimulate a response with my listeners and they then start out with a story of their own. So writing them down does not come easily. But thanks for the encouragement. When a few more bales of hay are safely in the barn, I will write again. All the best, peter

Reply
Maureen
07/16/2013 6:59pm

My family was filled with storytellers. And I am one too. I write stories to my unborn grandchildren (now I actually have one) and to another little girl I call my BBFF (baby best friend forever)! Perhaps when you tell your stories here, some of us will be inspired to share ours or at least create them (offline) and spread the tales. Waiting to read one of yours.

Theresa
07/13/2013 4:43pm

I'm Polish, but I'm happy to "listen" to Irish stories!

Reply
Kathleen Anderson
07/18/2013 4:28pm

I love Peace Fleece yarn and I will enjoy following your stories about the farm.

Reply
07/18/2013 4:40pm

I am delighted to find your blog! I'm already a huge fan of your yarn, and your writing is icing on an already delicious cake!

It's really interesting to hear that writing stories is a challenge, since they flow so well. Thank you for the effort. Know that it is well appreciated.

Maureen (who's more Irish than anything, but still an American mutt.)

Reply
07/19/2013 11:29am

Hi Maureen, Kathleen, Tara, and Theresa,

Thank you all for the encouragement. I am going to start with some stories about the early days of Peace Fleece when the old USSR was coming apart and the New Russia was coming together. It was an exciting, tragic and dangerous time and the friends I made then are still very close to Marty and me.

Reply
Gladys Sicknick
07/19/2013 1:03pm

I tried to guage the DK peace fleece yarn but the 9.5 stitches and 2 inches on 5 and 7 needles don't work. HELP

Reply
Margot
07/19/2013 1:54pm

Hi Gladys, As in all patterns, needle size is a suggestion. Use whatever needle size gets the correct gauge.

If you haven't already done so, I encourage you to join the KAL at Ravelry for support. Follow the link in this blog post, above.

Reply
Barbara
07/20/2013 10:55am

How many skeins of the DK/sportweight yarn are needed for the sweater?

Reply
Rita
07/20/2013 12:28pm

Just printed out the DK modifications and noticed a typo in the sleeve measurements that you could correct. Looking forward to this KAL!

Reply
Irene
07/20/2013 6:21pm

Peter, I love the picture of you on your grandmother's lap! It looks as though you're studying your feet and wondering where the wool socks are!

Reply



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    Author

    Peter Hagerty and Marty Tracy are the co owners of Peace Fleece - a yarn and fiber company focused on uniting historic enemies through trade. Our online catalog- www.peacefleece.com  offers US grown / Native American fine wool yarn and batting, Russian hand painted knitting needles and buttons, as well as many tools and supplies for fiber enthusiasts, teachers and Waldorf educators.

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